After EMV, Will Fraud Move Online?

| Tim Parry

EMV greatly reduces the impact of in-store fraud, as the new cards with embedded chips generate a unique token for each transaction, making them difficult or impossible to counterfeit. But by almost all estimations, the U.S.’s move to EMV will lead to massive increases in ecommerce fraud, perhaps even more so than countries like the U.K. and Australia.

Merchants Face Increasing Challenges in Mitigating Fraud Losses

| Tim Parry

The 2015 LexisNexis True Cost of Fraud study offers important insights into the profound effects of fraud on merchants, consumers and financial institutions. It establishes the actual cost of fraud as witnessed by merchants and provides key findings and specific recommendations for the industry.

EMV’s Impact in the U.S.

| Nish Modi

A nationwide mandate to shift toward EMV begins in October 2015, and recent research from the National Retail Federation found that most retailers are unprepared.

Mobile Will Represent More Than Half of Transactions in 2015

| Tim Parry

Additionally, as retailers make the looming switch to EMV payments systems, those systems also accept mobile capabilities such as Apple Pay, which will also contribute to increased mobile payments. Click for more 2015 cybercrime predictions from ThreatMetrix.